Found 351 blog entries tagged as Higbie Maxon Agney.

Last week we profiled Norval Wardrop, a well-known architect in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th Century. Aside from working on numerous commercial projects he also created fine homes for prestigious clients, including 319 Lincoln in Grosse Pointe.

This week we focus on the work of Ellen Biddle Shipman, a nationally renowned landscape architect who was known for her formal gardens, simple clean geometries, and lush planting style. Shipman, throughout her career, created over 650 gardens, including at least 46 in Grosse Pointe – more than any other community in the United States. 

Ellen Biddle Shipman was considered a pioneer in her field during the first half of the 20th century. Born in Philadelphia on November 5, 1869, she spent her early…

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Last week we explored an historic home with a bit of a mystery. 1004 Audubon in Grosse Pointe Park was completed in 1918, for Detroit Judge P. J. M. Hally. The original address of the property was 16213 E. Jefferson; however, the home underwent a change of address when part of the lot was sold in 1962. As for the mystery, well, that would be who designed it.

This week we would like to introduce you to the architect Norval Wardrop, a respected architect in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th Century. Aside from creating fine homes for prestigious clients, Wardrop, throughout his career, was also associated with designing commercial buildings such as factories and was heavily involved with making improvements/additions to churches, schools,…

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Last week we stopped by 900 Sunningdale. This 1930’s “modern family home”, completed in 1937, was a Detroit Free Press Home-of-the Week in March 1938. It was designed and built by F. F. Hannan, Inc.

This week we look at an historic home with a bit of a mystery. 1004 Audubon in Grosse Pointe Park was completed in 1918, for Detroit judge P. J. M. Hally. The original address of the property was 16213 E. Jefferson; however, it appears the home underwent a change of address when part of the lot was sold in 1962. As for the mystery, well, that would be who designed it. 

1004 Audubon is a classically designed brick built Georgian Colonial residence, originally located on 1.05 acres. The exterior of this symmetrical brick-built home features multiple…

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Last week we explored 242 Lewiston, a unique residence that is situated on a significant slope and designed accordingly to fit into its surroundings. The French Country style home was completed in 1929, for Realtor George McMahon, having been designed by the multi-talented Wallace Frost.

This week we visit 900 Sunningdale. This 1930’s “modern family home” was a Detroit Free Press Home-of-the Week in March 1938. We first introduced you to the Homes of the Week towards the end of last year when we profiled 285 Mt Vernon, 223 Merriweather Rd (now 305 Merriweather) and its next-door neighbor 225 Merriweather Rd (now 307 Merriweather). You can read the full stories by clicking here and here.

The Home-of-the Week recipients appear to vary considerably…

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Last week we concluded our exploration of Woodland Place with a visit to number 6. Completed in 1925, this 4,876 sq ft home was created in an English architectural approach. The house was commissioned by Harry Seymour Finkenstadt and was designed by Robert O. Derrick - his second project on the street. 

This week we return to the work of prolific architect Wallace Frost with a more in-depth review of 242 Lewiston, created for George P. McMahon. We recently presented the history of Mr. Frost’s career, during which he designed 44 residences in and around Birmingham and at least nine homes in Grosse Pointe. You can read the full story by clicking here.

During his career Wallace Frost created several wonderful homes in the Grosse Pointe communities.…

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Last week we took a closer look at 2 Woodland Place, the venue of this year’s GPHS gala. Completed in 1928, 2 Woodland Place sits on 1.4 acres and overlooks Lake St. Clair. It was architect Robert O. Derrick’s third project on the street and was extensively remodeled by Hugh T. Keyes in 1941.

This week we conclude our exploration of Woodland Place with a visit to number 6. Completed in 1925, this 4,876 sq ft home was created in an English architectural approach. The house was commissioned by Harry Seymour Finkenstadt and was designed by Robert O. Derrick - his second project on the street. 

6 Woodland Place is a striking home. We were lucky enough to have been contacted by one of the former owners Dr. Delf Dodge who lived at the residence with…

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Last week, in anticipation of the Grosse Pointe Historical Societies annual gala, we revisited the historic road of Woodland Place, a narrow street, paved with bricks, and home to several unique residences. The majority of the homes constructed in the 1920’s (5 in total) were built by just a handful of noted architects. 

This week we take a closer look at 2 Woodland Place, the venue of the gala on June 22. Completed in 1928, 2 Woodland Place sits on 1.4 acres and overlooks Lake St. Clair. It was architect Robert O. Derrick’s third project on the street.

2 Woodland Place is a striking home, created for Florence T. Eddy, widow of Frank Woodman Eddy – a prominent businessman in Detroit who had made his fortune from chemical and rubber…

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Last week we stopped by 355 Lincoln, one of the most distinguished homes in Grosse Pointe City. The 8,700 sq ft English Manor was designed by the renowned New York based firm Alfred Hopkins & Associates for Dr. Theodore McGraw, Jr. The gardens were designed by legendary landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman.

This week, in anticipation of the Grosse Pointe Historical Societies annual gala, to be held at 2 Woodland Place on June 22, we revisit the historic road of Woodland Place.

Woodland Place, once a heavily wooded area on the shores of Lake St. Clair, is a narrow street, paved with bricks, and home to several unique residences. Most of the homes, constructed in the 1920’s (5 in total), were built by just a handful of noted architects. What…

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Last week we presented the history of St. Clare parish, school and church. The origins of the parish date back to 1923. In 1927, the first parish school opened, designed by Van Leyen, Schilling & Keogh. The new church was dedicated in 1953, designed by Diehl and Diehl.

This week we head to 355 Lincoln, one of the most distinguished homes in Grosse Pointe City. The 8,700 sq ft English Manor was designed by the renowned New York based firm Alfred Hopkins & Associates for Dr. Theodore McGraw, Jr. The gardens were designed by legendary landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman. 

355 Lincoln was completed in 1923. It is a striking property and markedly prominent in the community. The house has beautiful architectural details inside and…

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Last week we continued with the story of St. Ambrose Parish with a feature on the parochial school that was designed by Donaldson and Meier. The school opened in 1920, with 650 grade school students, a high school was added in 1923. The building was razed in 1983. Prior to our piece about the school, we had also recently featured the history of St. Ambrose Church, completed in 1927, it was also designed by Donaldson and Meier. In 1964, St. Ambrose parish hired architectural firm Diehl and Diehl to design a new grade school.

This week we feature another historic parish, St. Clare, as we explore its church and school. The origins of St Clare parish date back to 1923, when Father James A. McDonald, pastor of St. Augustine Church in Hamtramck, was…

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