Last week we introduced you to 487 Rivard. Esselstyn and Murphy completed this grand clapboard Colonial property, in 1919, for Bernhard Stroh Jr., former president of the Stroh Brewery Company. 

This week we head to Grosse Pointe Park, and to a classic Tudor Revival estate, 750 Whittier. This spectacular residence was completed, in 1920, for Detroit lumber baron, Frederic M. Sibley. According to an article in the Detroit Free Press, when the house was built it disturbed a rum-running operation that used the shore as a landing spot.

It appears the architect for this property could be the noted designer, Charles Kotting, which is the name listed on our files. Charles Kotting was one of the most prestigious architects in the city of Detroit during…

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Last week we presented 1 Donovan Place, completed in 1916, by George D. Mason, for Fremont Woodruff. The superb French styled home is situated next to the lake; the original address of the residence was 17160 E. Jefferson.

This week we are going to introduce you to 487 Rivard, Grosse Pointe City. Esselstyn and Murphy completed this superb clapboard colonial style home, in 1919, for Bernard Stroh Jr., former president of the Stroh Brewery Company.

Rivard, named after the Rivard family, one of the earliest French farmers to settle in the Grosse Pointe region, was heavily developed in the early twentieth century. Many of the older homes on this prestigious street were constructed between 1918 and 1922, having been designed by several leading…

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Last week we introduced you to the work of Hancock & Butler. The firm was particular active in Grosse Pointe during the late 1920’s, as both designer’s and builders. Between 1928 through 1931 they designed and built around 17 homes, in the Farms and City.

This week we are going to stop by 1 Donovan Place. Completed in 1916, by George D. Mason, for Fremont Woodruff, the original address of the residence was 17160 E. Jefferson.

George Mason first appeared in Grosse Pointe in 1882. The firm of Mason & Rice was commissioned to design ‘Edgmere’ for Joseph Berry; one of the first grand year-round homes in the community (located at 50 Lake Shore Drive – now demolished).

At the time the predominant style of the firm was heavily influenced by…

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Last week we explored one of the lost mansions, 15444 Windmill Pointe. Completed, in 1951, it was designed by Alfred C. Emmerling for Alfred Epstein, president of the Pfeiffer Brewing Company. It was demolished in 2016, and a new home is currently being constructed in its place.

This week we would like to introduce you to the work of Hancock & Butler. The firm was particular active in Grosse Pointe during the late 1920’s, as both designer’s and builders. Like several other firms who were extremely productive in the community during this era, Hancock and Butler were responsible for the design and build. In some instances they were responsible for just the construction, collaborating with noted architects who had designed the residence.

Several…

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