Last week we began a two-part story of the history of the Junior League of Detroit’s (JLD) Designers’ Show House (DSH). The event, which began in 1976, has been held in 25 different houses, raised over $5million, and has welcomed over 280,000 guests.

This week we conclude the history of the event as we look at the homes from 2000 through 2024. The journey has now come to an end after 48 years, with 315 Lakeland, its final destination. 

The Designers’ Show Houses: 2000 – 2024.

2000 – 15410 Windmill Pointe
15410 Windmill Pointe is an English inspired manor house designed by Alfred Hopkins & Associates. It was completed, in 1924, for William Harris, an investment banker, a significant authority in zoology, and father of stage actress, Julie…

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Last week we explored 16638 E Jefferson, originally built for Frank W. Eddy in 1911-12. In 1927, under the new ownership of John B. Ford Jr., the house underwent an extensive remodel to create the property we know today.

This week we begin a two-part story of the history of the Junior League of Detroit’s (JLD) Designers’ Show House (DSH). The event is currently being held at 315 Lakeland, Grosse Pointe. However, after 48-years, the journey will come to an end with this, its final destination.

The JLD’s Designers Show House began in 1976 and has been held in 25 different houses (23 in the Grosse Pointe communities and 2 in Detroit). The event was first conceived in San Francisco in the early 1970’s. During this time a member of the JLD headed to…

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Last week we concluded the story of 16710 E Jefferson. The two-part post was a recollection of memories from Jeff Farkas about his childhood home, published with Jeff's permission.

 This week we head to one of neighboring properties to explore 16638 E Jefferson, “St. Dunstan”, originally built for Frank W. Eddy in 1911-12. In 1927, under the new ownership of John B. Ford Jr., (vice president of Wyandotte Chemical) the house underwent an extensive remodel to create the property we know today.

16638 E Jefferson is adjacent to what was the Leslie Gillette residence (16708 E Jefferson), and close to 16710 E Jefferson. The original property was a Victorian style home, built for Frank W. Eddy, a prominent businessman in Detroit who had made his…

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Last week we began the story of 16710 E Jefferson with a recollection of memories from Jeff Farkas about his childhood home. It presented a fascinating history of the property that was completed in 1897 - one of the older surviving homes in all the Grosse Pointe communities.

This week we continue the story, with the terrible fire that engulfed the property, the middle years, and the birth of Jefferson Court. The following is written by Jeff Farkas, edited by Katie Doelle, and is published with Jeff's permission.

This is Jeff’s story…Part 2

1966-1967: The House

In late December 1966, our home was the victim of a terrible fire.  It started when old wiring, located on the staircase connecting the porch to the second floor, had a short…

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Last week we explored the work of a lesser-known architect Hiram H. Hallett. His residential projects spanned a period of several decades and encompassed a broad spectrum of architectural styles.

This week we are going to share the story of 16710 E Jefferson (now 8 Jefferson Court). Completed in 1897, the property is one of the older surviving homes in all the Grosse Pointe communities.

We first explored this home in 2020. However, we were recently contacted by Jeff Farkas, (who grew up in the house), and he asked if we could make a few updates to the post. Well, we did better than that, Jeff kindly sent us a detailed story. The following blog post is a recollection of Jeff's memories from his childhood and presents a fascinating history of the…

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Last week we stopped by the prestigious street of Lochmoor Blvd to explore 50 Lochmoor. The elegant Colonial style home was designed in 1923, by the nationally renowned architect William Buck Stratton and his partner (at the time), Dalton J. Snyder.

This week we are going to look at the work of architect Hiram Harvey Hallett. We received a request from Mr. Hallett’s grandson, Lee to research some of the projects completed by his grandfather, who’s career spanned several decades and encompassed multiple architectural styles.

Hiram Harvey Hallett was born February 11, 1870, in Oil City, Pennsylvania – one of nine children. We couldn’t find any details about his education, but we did learn that in 1898, he married Blanche Alberta Sweetwood and…

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Last week we presented the work of Pollmar and Ropes. The firm was prolific in Detroit during the first 30 years of the 20th century, specializing in the design of apartments, stores, and industrial buildings.

This week we head to the prestigious street of Lochmoor Blvd to explore 50 Lochmoor, designed in 1923, by the nationally renowned architect William Buck Stratton and his partner (at the time), Dalton J. Snyder for George Hilsendegen.

It appears William B. Stratton and Dalton J. Snyder became partners around 1915. The duo worked together for over a decade and designed many buildings in Detroit including the Women’s City Club, Ford Hospital, the Maybury Sanitarium, along with several movie theaters (the Center Theater, Home Theater, Jewel…

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Last week we headed to one of the finest homes ever built in Grosse Pointe Shores, 880 Lake Shore, designed by architectural legend Albert Kahn in 1916, for Clinton Goodloe Edgar.

This week we return to the work of Pollmar and Ropes. We first touched on the work of this architectural firm a couple of weeks ago when we presented the history of 900 Lake Shore, a home that our files indicate was designed by the duo.

The firm of Pollmar and Ropes dates to 1902, when Detroit based architects George H. Ropes and F. Carl Pollmar became partners. The firm was prolific in the city during the first 30 years of the 20th century, specializing in the design of apartments, stores, and industrial buildings. Their work was often described as a “modern…

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Last week we presented some of the homes on Lake Shore, in Grosse Pointe Shores, that were built before 1911, of which there were more than a dozen properties. A significant number of the homes built around this period still exist today.

This week we remain in Grosse Pointe Shores to explore one of the finest homes ever built in the community, 880 Lake Shore, designed by architectural legend Albert Kahn for the leader of Michigan’s sugar industry Clinton Goodloe Edgar. 

880 Lake Shore, completed in 1916, is an 8,403 sq ft Italian Renaissance inspired residence - a popular choice of Kahn for the projects he completed in Grosse Pointe Shores during this era. William Hawkins Ferry, in The Buildings of Detroit, wrote “the Italian Renaissance…

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Last week we visited the Grosse Pointe Shores municipal park, located at 800 Lake Shore Rd. The 8.3-acre park was named after George Osius in recognition of his contributions to The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores.

This week we stay in Grosse Pointe Shores to look at some of the homes that were built before 1911. 1911 was a significant year in the community - The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores (GPS) was incorporated on April 3; President George Osius hosted the first Village Council meeting at his home on Tuesday April 11.

The early residents of Grosse Pointe Shores played a significant role in the development and success of the community. Many lived in homes constructed before 1911, of which there were more than a dozen properties. It was a…

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