Last week, as we celebrate out 90th anniversary, we presented the story of Higbie Maxon Agney, an achievement Kay Agney and her team is extremely proud of. 

This week we return to Windmill Pointe. Recently we have explored the early history of Windmill Pointe, and the Windmill Point Lighthouse. As we continue the story of this historic area we take a glimpse at some of the magnificent mansions that were built during the 1920’s.

To recap, in 1916 a new group founded the Windmill Pointe Land Company. The land was subsequently subdivided and called the Windmill Pointe subdivision. It runs parallel to the lake in an easterly direction as far as Bedford Road. Beginning in the 1920’s Windmill Pointe was the height of popularity, and became a much…

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Last week we explored an iconic structure, the Windmill Point Lighthouse – a light that has stood at the entrance of Lake St. Clair for around 180 years. 

This week we would like to present another constant beacon in the community – Higbie Maxon Agney. This year Higbie Maxon Agney celebrates its 90th anniversary, an achievement Kay Agney and her team is extremely proud of.

The roots of the company can be traced back to 1929 to the Maxon Brothers Real Estate Firm. In 1972 Mr. Hugo S. Higbie acquired the Maxon Brothers Real Estate Firm and renamed the joined firms Higbie Maxon Realtors, Inc. That same year Higbie Maxon located to the Hill in Grosse Pointe Farms. 

However, before we go too far, lets step back in time, and then we can return…

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Last week we presented the history of Windmill Pointe, one of the most historic areas in the Grosse Pointe communities. The origin of the area dates back to 1712. 

This week we stay close to Windmill Pointe as we explore another iconic structure, the Windmill Point Lighthouse – a light that has stood at the entrance of Lake St. Clair for around 180 years.

The year is 1837. The customs collector in Detroit, Andrew Mack, had purchased a nearly four-acre site at the confluence of Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River for a lighthouse to be constructed. That same year Congress had appropriated $5,000 (around $133,000 today) for “building a lighthouse on Windmill Island, at the outlet of Lake St. Clair”. 12 months later, the lighthouse had been…

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Last week we presented Sunnycroft, the lost estate of Mrs. William K. Anderson that was once located at 70 Moran. It was completed in 1919 having been designed by William F. Goodrich, and demolished in 1957.

This week we head to Windmill Pointe - one of the most recognized, and historic areas in the Grosse Pointe communities. The origin of Windmill Pointe dates back to 1712.

During the early 20th century Grosse Pointe was rapidly transforming from a summer retreat to a year round residence. Improved roads to Detroit coupled with the advent of the car were heavily influencing this transformation. Grosse Pointe Park was one area in particular that was proving to be extremely popular for wealthy Detroiters and professionals to re locate to the suburbs.…

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Last week we explored the work of Frank A. Miles. He designed close to 20 homes that we know of, throughout Grosse Pointe between 1926 and 1948. Much of his work is on some of Grosse Pointe’s more noted streets such as Provencal, Lothrop, Touraine, and Renaud. 

This week we return to the lost estates to present 70 Moran, also known as Sunnycroft. William F. Goodrich designed this beautiful property, in 1919, for Mrs. William K. Anderson. 

As the photos below demonstrate it is a superb residence created in an English Cottage style. This approach was popular in many areas of the United States from 1915 to 1940, from small homes to grand manors. Typical characteristics associated with this approach include an asymmetric configuration, a steeply…

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