Last week we told the story of 61 Lochmoor Boulevard, a brick built French Colonial property, designed and built by Walter H. Mast, in 1942, as a speculative home. That same year businessman Donald A. Noble purchased the residence. 

This week we stop by 114 Lothrop, a grand Regency home designed by Hugh T. Keyes in 1937, for decorated Canadian World War 1 veteran, Doctor J. Stewart Hudson. Measuring 10,586 sq ft it is one of Keyes larger homes in Grosse Pointe. It was built by Talbot & Meier.

114 Lothrop, “Hudson House” is one of several Regency style homes built by Keyes in Grosse Pointe during the 1930’s. An article by Thomas W. Brunk, in the Architectural Forum 1937, explains ‘few traditional domestic styles are more in harmony with…

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Last week we presented the story of Rathbone Place – the historic street has some of the finest one-of-a-kind residences in Grosse Pointe. With the first property completed well over 100 years ago, this private street is recognized as a noteworthy historic district. 

This week we head to 61 Lochmoor Boulevard. The 3,659 sq ft brick built French Colonial property was designed and built by Walter H. Mast, in 1942.

61 Lochmoor was built as a speculative home. It was originally listed for sale by the architect/builder Walter Mast. The definition of a speculative home is – ‘a residence built without a particular buyer in mind or under contract but designed to appeal to the maximum market possible’. Speculative homes were particularly popular in…

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Last week we explored the history of 4 Rathbone Place, a stunning Colonial Revival home completed in 1916-17 for Samuel T. Douglas, a senior member of one of the oldest law firms in Detroit, Douglas and Bowen. It was designed by the renowned duo of Chittenden and Kotting.

This week we stay on Rathbone Place to present the full story of this historic street that has some of the finest one-of-a-kind residences in Grosse Pointe dating back to the beginning of the Twentieth century. One of the earliest inhabitants on the street was Charles A. Rathbone, president of the Buhl Malleable Company. His father, William P. Rathbone, was one of the most prominent and successful real estate men in the state of Michigan during the nineteenth century. It is also…

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Last week we presented the full story of 17805 E Jefferson, the huge W. Howie Muir estate completed in 1913, by the renowned designers Chittenden and Kotting. The W. Howie Muir residence was a grand 35-room Colonial home located on a large lot that ran from Lincoln to Fisher Road. After suffering catastrophic damage from a flood in December 1953, the property was demolished and the land sub divided. 

This week we stay with the work of Chittenden and Kotting as we explore 4 Rathbone Place, a stunning Colonial Revival home completed in 1916-17 for Samuel T. Douglas, a senior member of one of the oldest law firms in Detroit, Douglas and Bowen. 

It is apparent 4 Rathbone Place was one of the last projects Chittenden and Kotting completed before…

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Last week we turned our attention to a very special home – 29 Fisher. It is reported 29 Fisher was formerly the stables on the estate that was once owned by Matilda Dodge – 17805 E. Jefferson. Mrs. Dodge purchased the estate from W. Howie Muir in 1921. It is rumored the stables, on the original Muir estate, had been converted from an existing building (around 1925) by Smith, Hinchman & Grylls for Mrs. Dodge who was an avid rider. 

This week we would like to present the full story of 17805 E Jefferson, the huge W. Howie Muir estate completed in 1913, by the renowned designers Chittenden and Kotting. The W. Howie Muir residence was a grand 35-room Colonial home located on a large lot that ran from Lincoln to Fisher Road. The exterior of 17805…

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Last week we presented the history of Colonial Revival Architecture. The style has been described as one of the most widespread and well-known residential architectural trends in America’s history. It is also one of the most popular architectural styles throughout Grosse Pointe.

This week we turn our attention to a very special home – welcome to 29 Fisher. It is reported 29 Fisher was formally the stables on the estate that was once owned by Matilda Dodge – 17805 E. Jefferson. Mrs. Dodge purchased the estate from W. Howie Muir, in 1921. It is rumored the stables, on the original Muir estate, had been converted from an existing building (around 1925) by Smith, Hinchman & Grylls for Mrs. Dodge who was an avid rider. 

17805 E. Jefferson (the…

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Last week we explored 470 Washington. This uniquely styled 2,754 sq ft English Tudor home was completed in 1918, by architect J. Will Wilson for himself and built by the H. A. Jones Construction Company. What makes this property architecturally distinctive is the steep shingle thatched roof – a unique feature on numerous homes in the Grosse Pointe communities. 

This week we delve into the history of Colonial Revival Architecture, one of the most popular architectural styles throughout Grosse Pointe. Colonial Revival architecture has been described as one of the most widespread and well-known residential architectural trends in America’s history. The approach was particularly popular from 1910–1930, ‘during this period the Colonial Revival movement…

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Last week we concluded our exploration of the Hill as we presented the story of the Grosse Pointe Central Library. Completed in 1953, the library was designed by Hungarian born, New-York based architect Marcel Breuer – one of the world's most popular architects at the peak of 20th-century design. It is believed the library was one of Breuer’s first major public commissions in the United States and his only building in Metro Detroit.

This week we head to 470 Washington. This uniquely styled 2,754 sq ft English Tudor home was completed in 1918, by architect J. Will Wilson for himself and built by the H. A. Jones Construction Company. What makes this property architecturally distinctive is the steep shingle thatched roof. Another feature that makes…

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Last week we returned to the Hill to continue our presentation of the historic commercial district with the story of the Punch and Judy Theater. The theater, located at 17 Kercheval Avenue, opened in January 1930. The opening not only marked the beginning of the theater, but of the Hill business district in general which then began to gradually spread north towards Muir Road as more businesses began moving in. 

This week we conclude our exploration of the Hill as we take a visit to the Grosse Pointe Central Library. Completed in 1953, the library was designed by Hungarian born, New-York based architect Marcel Breuer – one of the world's most popular architects at the peak of 20th-century design. It is believed the library was one of Breuer’s first…

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Last week we presented the story of 1009 Harvard in Grosse Pointe. The 2,993 sq ft brick French Colonial property was designed by prolific architect Carl R. Habermas and built by noted builder, R. C. Ranke. It was completed in 1940. Despite being built over 80 years ago the house, to date, has only had two owners.

This week we return to the Hill to continue our story of this historic commercial district. Over the past couple of weeks, we have explored the history of the Hill along with The Bronze Door restaurant. Now it’s time to look at where it all began with the Punch and Judy Theater. The theater, located at 17 Kercheval Avenue, opened in January 1930, to much fanfare. The opening not only marked the beginning of the theater, but of the Hill…

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