Last week we went back in time to review one of the former grand homes on Lake Shore, 500 Lake Shore, also known as “Stonehurst”. The early English Renaissance “castle” was designed by Pittsburgh architect Albert H. Spahr, in 1917, for Joseph B. Scholtman and his wife Stella Ford.

This week we head to another lost home on the lake, 575 Lake Shore, also known as “Clairview”, part of the collection of beautiful homes that brought turn-of-the-century elegance to the shores of Lake St. Clair. Image is courtesy of © Indiana Limestone Company. Courtesy, Indiana Geological and Water Survey, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.

575 Lake Shore, “Clairview”, an elegant Beaux-Arts Italian Renaissance “palace”, was completed between 1911-1915, for…

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Last week we explored historic 35 Fisher Rd. Completed in 1909, this iconic home was designed by Smith, Hinchman, & Grylls - one of the leading architectural firms in the United States at the turn of the century. 35 Fisher Rd started out as Grosse Pointe’s first telephone exchange for the Home Telephone Company, serving the community for around eight years. 

This week we go back in time to one of the former grand homes on Lake Shore, welcome to 500 Lake Shore, also known as “Stonehurst”. The early English Renaissance “castle” was designed by Pittsburgh architect Albert H. Spahr, in 1917, for Joseph B. Scholtman and his wife Stella Ford. 

In 1914, after returning from a three-month honeymoon abroad, Joseph Scholtman commissioned Albert H. Spahr…

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Last week we reviewed a home created by contemporary architect Anne (Krebs) Crane, 15 Moorland - she designed for her and her husband, builder George C. Crane. Ms. Crane, in conjunction with her husband, was responsible for the design and/or build of several outstanding modern properties in Grosse Pointe from the 1950’s through to the beginning of the 1990’s.

This week we head to historic 35 Fisher Road. Completed in 1909, this iconic home was designed by Smith, Hinchman, & Grylls - one of the leading architectural firms in the United States at the turn of the century. 

35 Fisher Road (original address was 285 Fisher Rd) started out as Grosse Pointe’s first telephone exchange for the Home Telephone Company, serving the community for around eight…

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Last week we featured some of the homes in Grosse Pointe that use Indiana limestone as an integral part of the design, either as cladding or as trim. Indiana limestone has helped build a community and has played a massive part in the architectural history of Grosse Pointe. It remains permanently on display on some of the finest homes and public buildings in the area - an “aristocrat building material” that made such a difference to the composition of a home.

This week we jump forward into the 1950’s to review a home designed by contemporary architect Anne (Krebs) Crane, welcome to 15 Moorland. Ms. Crane was responsible for the design of several outstanding modern properties in Grosse Pointe from the 1950’s through to the beginning of the 1990’s. 

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Last week we explored 805 Trombley, a once superb limestone clad property that was located on the corner of Tombley and Essex Drive. It appears the property was completed in 1928, by the firm of C. E. Reichle Co. Designers & Builders, for Robert E. Farley, president of the Hillgartner natural stone company in Baltimore, Maryland. It was razed in 2008.

This week we are going to feature some of the other homes in Grosse Pointe that use Indiana Limestone as an integral part of the design, either as cladding or as trim. Limestone cladding - characterized by smooth, even faces and square edges, often several inches thick - was used to shape the aesthetic of a home. However, in many cases it was the trim, the intricate carved limestone details around the…

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Last week we explored a rather special home in Grosse Pointe Park – 813 Trombley, a grand Tudor style home completed by the firm of Roscoe W. Babcock, Inc. In 1928, the property was open for the public to tour, presented as “one of the finest and most complete homes ever produced in Metropolitan Detroit”. 

This week we stay on Trombley to explore 805 Trombley, a once superb limestone clad property that was located on the corner of Trombley and Essex Drive. It appears the property was completed in 1928, by the firm of C. E. Reichle Co. Designers & Builders, for Robert E. Farley, president of the Hillgartner natural stone company in Baltimore, Maryland. It appears Mr. Farley opened an office for the company in Detroit in 1920. The photo below is…

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Last week we visited the Grosse Pointe Farms sewage pumping station, located at 305 Chalfonte. It was completed in 1929, having been designed by prominent Detroit architect, J. Ivan Dise and built by engineering firm Hubbell, Hartgering & Roth. Image courtesy of waymarking.com

This week we explore a rather special home in Grosse Pointe Park – welcome to 813 Trombley, a grand Tudor style home completed by the firm of Roscoe W. Babcock, Inc. It is a distinct possibility that Roscoe W. Babcock designed and built 813 Trombley as a 3,569 sq ft speculative home. The definition of a speculative home is – ‘a residence built without a particular buyer in mind or under contract but designed to appeal to the maximum market possible’. Speculative homes were…

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Last week we concluded our series on Richard H. Marr, the “Architect of Midwest Millionaires” as we presented some of the residential projects he created in Grosse Pointe during the 1920’s and 1930’s.

This week we head to Grosse Pointe Farms to visit the city’s sewage pumping station, located at 305 Chalfonte. It was completed in 1929, having been designed by prominent Detroit architect, J. Ivan Dise and built by engineering firm Hubbell, Hartgering & Roth. Image courtesy of waymarking.com

The majority of Dise’s creations in Grosse Pointe occurred during the 1920’s and 30’s. Prior to designing The Village of Grosse Pointe Farms important new facility, Dise’s focus of attention in the community was primarily residential projects. His houses…

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Over the past couple of weeks, we have explored two of the homes designed by Richard H. Marr – 607 Lakepointe and 740 Whittier. The house on Whittier was one of Marr’s more distinguished projects, completed in 1933 for Detroit’s “Aluminum King” C. B. Bohn, president of Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation.

This week we conclude our series on Richard H. Marr, the “Architect of Midwest Millionaires” as we present some of his other projects, he created in Grosse Pointe during the 1920’s and 1930’s.

Richard Marr was born in Detroit in August 1886. After leaving to study architecture at Harvard, (graduating in 1911), Marr then spent two years working in Boston. In 1913, he returned to Detroit to work for renowned architect George D. Mason. Two years…

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Last week we were in Grosse Pointe Park to present the story of 607 Lakepointe, designed by Richard H. Marr in 1938 for Dr. J. Edgar Norris, chairman of Pathology and acting dean of the Wayne State University College of Medicine. 607 Lakepointe was featured in a 1938 edition of the Detroit Free Press as their ‘East Side Home of the Week’. The Detroit Free Press ‘East Side Home of the Week’ created ‘an opportunity to acquire many ideas which may be incorporated in homes large and small’.

This week we stay with the work of Richard H. Marr, as we explore one of his most distinguished projects, 740 Whittier, completed in 1933, for Detroit’s “Aluminum King” C. B. Bohn, president of Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation.

Richard H. Marr, known in the…

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