Last week we went to Grosse Pointe City to explore the picturesque street of Village Lane, located between Cadieux and Notre Dame. The historic properties, completed before 1930, provide an eclectic mix of architectural styles from traditional Clapboard Colonial though to an English cottage style residence.

This week we turn our attention to a rather prominent road in Grosse Pointe Farms, Lewiston, in part one of a two-part series. During the first half of the 20th century, an era of substantial residential growth in Grosse Pointe Farms, Lewiston Road became the location of multiple impactful homes that were created by some of Detroit’s most distinguished architects. In part one, we will take a look at the first block, located between Grosse Pointe…

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Last week we presented 35 Fisher Road. Completed in 1909, by Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 35 Fisher Road started out as Grosse Pointe’s first telephone exchange for the Home Telephone Company. After serving the community for around eight years it is now a stunning historic home.

This week we stay in Grosse Pointe City and head to the picturesque street of Village Lane, located between Cadieux and Notre Dame. The properties on Village Lane were created in two different eras - the even numbered historic homes completed during the 1920’s, and the odd numbered modern Colonial homes built in the late 1940’s. It is the history of the earlier properties that we will be focusing on.

The historic homes on Village Lane have double digit numbers today,…

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Last week we explored 223 Lake Shore, a lost estate that was commissioned by John Francis Dodge, in 1918, but was never fully completed. Located on an 11-acre lot, Mr. Dodge hired Smith, Hinchman & Grylls to design a lavish home to be one of the finest in the country. It was demolished in 1941. 

This week we are going to feature another creation by Smith, Hinchman & Grylls – 35 Fisher Road. From what we can determine 35 Fisher Road, completed in 1909, was one of Smith, Hinchman & Grylls earliest projects in Grosse Pointe.

35 Fisher Road started out as Grosse Pointe’s first telephone exchange, for the Home Telephone Company, serving the community for around eight years. At the time of completion, the floor plan was designed solely for commercial…

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Last week we profiled the work of Harlow N. Davock. He designed at least five homes in Grosse Pointe from 1913 through to 1920, including four homes on Washington as part of the ‘Grosse Pointe Colony’ development in Grosse Pointe City.

This week we head to 223 Lake Shore, a lost estate that was commissioned by John Francis Dodge, in 1918, but was never fully completed.

John Francis Dodge hired the firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, in 1918, to design what was intended to be the largest residence in the Detroit Area. Located on an 11 acre, 376’ x 1200 feet lot, Dodge had planned for the lavish home to be one of the “finest in the country”. 

According to research in Tonnancour it is understood the project was assigned to Bloodgood Tuttle, (of…

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Last week we explored 10 Provencal. Located at the foot of the hill on this prestigious road in Grosse Pointe Farms, the International style home was completed in 1937. Giffels & Vallet Inc., L. Rosetti designed the property for Le Roy Ernest Swift and his wife Marjorie I. McMillan. 

This week we turn our attention to the work of Harlow N. Davock. He designed at least five homes in Grosse Pointe from 1913 through to 1920. As with so many designers who worked in the community during the early 20th century Mr. Davock had to compete for attention alongside Detroit’s nationally acclaimed architects – the likes of Albert Kahn, Louis Kamper, William B. Stratton and C. Howard Craine to name but a few. Davock, along with many other lesser-known yet equally…

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Last week we presented the lost estate 10 Moross – on the corner of Moross and Lake Shore. It is believed this once grand home was designed in the early 20th century (around 1905) by Louis Kamper and razed in 1968.

This week we head to another prominent street off of Lake Shore to explore 10 Provencal, located at the foot of the hill of this prestigious road in Grosse Pointe Farms. The International style home was completed in 1937. Giffels & Vallet Inc., L. Rosetti designed the property for Le Roy Ernest Swift and his wife Marjorie I. McMillan. John Weinhandt built it.

10 Provencal is constructed from concrete and steel with a smooth, untextured flat surface. Large windows and sweeping balconies dominate the front elevation, as does the…

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Last week we explored 130 Kenwood, completed in 1926. J. Ivan Dise designed the English Tudor style home for Luther David Thomas. It is one of the larger Dise homes in Grosse Pointe.

This week we head to a lost estate, 10 Moross – on the corner of Moross and Lake Shore. It is believed this once grand home was designed in the early 20th century (around 1905) by Louis Kamper and razed in 1968.

Born in Bavaria, Germany in 1861, Louis Kamper emigrated to the U.S with his family in 1880. He arrived in Detroit in 1888, and quickly established himself on the architectural scene, joining the firm of Scott & Scott, becoming partner within a year. The majority of Kamper’s career focused largely on two areas — designing magnificent residences for the…

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Last week we introduced you to the work of Arthur Knox Hyde. During his career Arthur K. Hyde was associated with some of the finest architects in Detroit and was a former partner of William B. Stratton. He created at least four homes in Grosse Pointe. 

This week we head to 130 Kenwood, completed in 1926. J. Ivan Dise designed the English Tudor style home for Luther David Thomas. It is one of the larger Dise homes in Grosse Pointe. 

The original address of 130 Kenwood was 50 Kenwood – post 1930, many house numbers on this street were changed. The 7,256 sq ft residence is constructed from brick with a steeply pitched slate roof. The impactful exterior features an elaborate oversized entrance with a recessed limestone porch, with seating, to the…

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Last week we explored the history of the golf course at Lochmoor Club. The utmost attention was given to the planning of the course that would be regarded as a full championship course. At the time, it was intended the course to be ranked among the best in the country - the course opened for play in June 1918. Renowned architect William B. Stratton completed the clubhouse that same year.

This week we would like to introduce you to Arthur Knox Hyde - a former partner of William B. Stratton – and the four projects he completed with David H. Williams, Jr.

Arthur K. Hyde was born in 1895. Having graduated from the University of Michigan he became a registered architect in Michigan in 1925. During his career he was associated with some of the finest…

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Last week we presented the story of the original clubhouse at Lochmoor Club. It was designed by William B. Stratton and Dalton J. Snyder, and completed in 1917-1918. It was demolished in 1924, because of a fire and a new clubhouse was built and opened later that year.

This week we continue the story of Lochmoor as we explore the history of the golf course. In 1917, a group of Detroit golf enthusiasts reportedly purchased 135 acres of farmland for the club to be located. When Lochmoor Club opened for play in June 1918, the club received Certificate No. 173 of Active Membership in the United States Golf Association. That same year the clubhouse was completed. Travis Beaupre, John H. Sweeny and the consulting architect Walter J. Travis (three-time…

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