Found 3 blog entries tagged as Tudor Revival.

Over the past couple of weeks, we have run a three-part series on the historic St. Paul’s Church complex. The series concluded with a review of the school and convent buildings, designed by Smith, Hinchman, and Grylls in September 1927. 

This week we stay with the theme of historic schools in Grosse Pointe as we visit Defer Elementary School - the oldest public-school building still in use in the Grosse Pointe Public School district. Defer was designed by renowned Detroit architect George J. Haas. Construction began in 1924, classes opened in February 1925. 

Defer Elementary School was originally built for Rural Agricultural School, District No. 1. It is located on the corner of Kercheval and Nottingham Road in Grosse Pointe Park. In 1921, Rural…

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Last week we presented a house listed on the National Register of Historic Places – 33 Oldbrook Lane, formerly known as “East Hall”. This incredible property was designed by George D. Mason in 1916-17, for John T. Woodhouse, one of Detroit’s leading tobacco merchants.

This week we return Oxford Road and the many homes developed by realtor and developer Arthur J. Scully. The development managed by Mr. Scully created the new Oxford subdivision during the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. In our first blog post about Oxford Road, we explored two of the larger homes developed by Scully - number 30 and number 40, located in the first block off Lake Shore. Both homes were designed in 1930, by two of Metro Detroit’s finest architectural firms – Smith, Hinchman &…

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Last week we explored the work of Walker and Weeks, an extremely prominent architectural firm in Cleveland with over 600 buildings to its name. In Grosse Pointe the firm completed just two residences in 1923 and 1935 – 1040 Devonshire and 717 Westchester. 

This week we head to a house listed on the National Register of Historic Places – welcome to 33 Oldbrook Lane, formerly known as “East Hall”. This incredible property was designed by George D. Mason in 1916-17, for John T. Woodhouse, one of Detroit’s leading tobacco merchants. The original address of the residence was 325 Lake Shore, it once had an uninterrupted view of the lake, while the rear faced Grosse Pointe Blvd.

33 Oldbrook Lane is a 9,881 sq ft, Tudor Revival asymmetric residence with…

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