Found 15 blog entries tagged as Albert Kahn.

Last week we visited 22 Lee Gate Lane, a one-of-a-kind modern residence designed by Hugh T. Keyes for Robert Hudson Tannahill, a renowned art collector in Detroit, nephew of department store king Joseph L. Hudson, and first cousin of Eleanor Ford, wife of Edsel Ford.

This week we are going to bring you the story 8 Carmel Lane, designed by Albert Kahn in 1912, for prominent businessman Philip H. McMillan. While we have featured much of Kahn’s work in Grosse Pointe, this is one of his projects we have yet to cover.

8 Carmel Lane was one of Kahn’s earlier projects in Grosse Pointe, and possibly one of his largest. At the time Albert Kahn was already a well-established architect in the city of Detroit. Under the name of Albert Kahn…

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Last week we started our exploration of Beverly Road with a look at the history of this prestigious street - part 1 of a three part series. Beverly Road is the only street in the Grosse Pointe communities that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

This week, in part 2, we take a look at the residences on the east side of Beverly Road - the even numbered homes: 24 through 44 - the first lots to be sold and developed. The two earliest homes constructed were numbers 28 and 40 – both completed in 1911/12. The modern photo’s below are courtesy of: Katie Doelle

24 Beverly Road - completed in 1914
24 Beverly is a large 5,976 Sq ft asymmetrical English Revival house. George W. Graves designed it for Mrs. Harriet N. Atterbury. You can…

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Last week we presented the magnificent 24 Beverly Road, designed by George W. Graves for Harriet N. Atterbury – it was completed in 1914. 

This week we stay on Beverly Road, for part 1 of a three part series. Over the next couple of weeks we will be exploring the residences that are located on this special street – the only road in the Grosse Pointe communities that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Beverly Road is located on the original Beverly Park sub-division that was platted by Henry B. Joy in 1910. The district was one of the earliest upper-class subdivisions in the Grosse Pointes, and played a major role in the area becoming an upscale community for wealthy Detroiters. All of the residences, aside from #35 (built in…

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Last week we presented 16632 E. Jefferson. Located on the shores of Lake St. Clair the traditional Tudor Revival home was commissioned by Edgar Bowen in 1926, and designed by Wallace Frost. 

This week we would like to introduce you to the work of Ernest Wilby, a talented designer who was arguably best known for the buildings he created during his time as Albert Kahn’s chief designer from 1903 until 1918. During this time he was associated with at least three stunning homes in the Grosse Pointe community between 1905 and 1911. Sadly all three homes have now been demolished.

Ernest Wilby was born in Yorkshire, England in 1869. During his career he worked with numerous architects in Toronto, London, New York City, and Detroit. Having graduated from…

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Last week we went to Lincoln Road to review three superb properties designed by George W. Graves.  Located on the same block between Maumee and Jefferson, they were completed between 1910 and 1918, in Georgian, Colonial, and English Tudor styles. 

Over the next couple of weeks we would like to present the story of four homes that have been relocated. These homes vary in size, and all four were relocated prior to 1930 - from just around the corner to several miles away - an incredible undertaking both logistically and architecturally. This week, in part 1, we focus on two grand properties that were once neighboring residences next to the river in Indian Village.

15520 Windmill Pointe – Relocated from 8192 East Jefferson Avenue
In 1903, John B.…

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Last week we presented the story of 17800 E. Jefferson, completed by Albert Kahn for Charles M. Swift in 1905 – now a lost estate. 

This week we turn our attention to the house next-door - 17840 E. Jefferson, “Rose Terrace I”, completed in 1910, for Horace Elgin Dodge - another of Albert Kahn’s masterpieces. Given the significance of this property and its successor we thought it was about time to tell the story of “Rose Terrace I”, and its later replacement “Rose Terrace II” next week. Photo is courtesy of: Legacy of Albert Kahn by W. Hawkins Ferry.

“Rose Terrace I” was located at 17840 E. Jefferson. Prior to its commission Horace E. Dodge, the younger of the Dodge siblings, had purchased land adjoining the former Detroit Country Club…

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Last week we presented 189 Cloverly, the Spanish Colonial Revival home designed by Albert Kahn for Julius H. Haass in 1927.

This week we stay with the work of Albert Kahn as we explore his creation at 17800 E. Jefferson – now a lost estate.

During the early 20th Century Albert Kahn was already a well-established architect in the city of Detroit. Under the name of Albert Kahn Associates (the firm he formed with his brother Julius, in 1895) Kahn’s skills were in high demand from wealthy clientele to create stately residences in the constantly evolving affluent suburbs of Detroit. 

After completing 81 Lake Shore, a grand Italian inspired residence completed in 1904, for Albert L. Stephens, Kahn was commissioned by Charles M. Swift to design…

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Last week we brought you the story of the Stonehurst Estate, the old and the new - the original home that was located on the property, and the new residences that have subsequently taken its place. 

This week we stay with the theme of lost mansions and head to 81 Lake Shore – a grand Italian inspired residence completed in 1904, by Albert Kahn for Albert L. Stephens. 

Albert L. Stevens was born in Romeo, Michigan in 1857. His father Henry was a prominent lumber baron. After his father passed in 1884, Albert and his brother Henry Jr. continued to manage the business together until 1895. Albert then turned his attention to the management of several corporations in which he was a stockholder – including the Wabash Portland Cement Company of Stroh,…

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Last week we presented the work of Williams & Coughlan, a firm that we had yet to feature. The duo created at least two homes in Grosse Pointe, between 1924 and 1926.

This week we are going to bring you the story of 735 Lake Shore, the old and the new. The original home that was located on the property, when it was razed, and the new residence that has taken its place. 

The Old
The history of 735 lake Shore dates back to 1930 when Albert Kahn completed a grand Tudor estate for Alvan Macauley. The home was one of the architectural masterpieces that were constructed on the shores of Lake St. Clair during the golden era of stately mansions.

The MaCauley residence was located on 52 acres (20 acres were in Grosse Pointe Woods), and stretched from…

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Last week we presented 37 Edgemere, a mid-century property, completed, in 1951, by Carl R. Habermas for Mr. and Mrs. M. Rivard Klippel. 

This week we are going to introduce you to another lost mansion, the original 1000 Lake Shore, former grand home of Louis Mendelssohn, and his wife Evelyn.

Louis Mendelssohn was a prominent figure in Detroit. He was born in Kempen, Germany, in 1853. His parents then moved to Detroit, in 1855. Having graduated high school he began working for the architectural firm of Sheldon and Mortimer L. Smith, and later as manufacturing draftsman in the car and locomotive department of the Michigan Central Railroad. Several years later he formed a partnership with Mortimer L. Smith, and together they worked on numerous…

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