Found 10 blog entries tagged as Raymond Carey.

Over the past couple of weeks, we have presented the work of English born architect Raymond Carey. Last week we took an in-depth look at one of his projects, 234 Provencal. The sublime Tudor style home was created in 1929, for George Malvin Holley Sr.

This week we conclude our series on the work of Raymond Carey as we explore 16960 E. Jefferson, completed in 1927-1928. Many of the homes Raymond Carey worked on in Grosse Pointe were created during the 1920’s and 1930’s. It appears he designed around 15 prestigious residences, the majority of which were created in his signature Georgian and Tudor Revival approach for prominent clientele. Unlike many of the noted architects who worked in Grosse Pointe during this era, it appears very few of Carey’s…

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Last week we presented the work of Raymond Carey and the many fabulous homes he created in Grosse Pointe. Carey was a key figure in Grosse Pointe, creating prestigious homes for prominent clientele during the 1920’s – 1930’s. His work was extremely sought after.

This week we take a more in-depth look at one of Carey’s projects, 234 Provencal. This sublime Tudor style home was created in 1929, for George Malvin Holley Sr. At one point Mr. Holley owned five homes in Grosse Pointe, two of which were designed by Raymond Carey.

Many of the homes Raymond Carey worked on in Grosse Pointe were created during the 1920’s and 1930’s. The majority were in his signature Georgian and Tudor Revival approach, including 234 Provencal. At its height of popularity…

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Last week we concluded our series on landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman as we explored 380 Provencal. The American Colonial style home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mr. and Mrs. Courtenay D. Allington in 1929. Ellen Biddle Shipman designed the formal garden - her second project on Provencal.

This week we continue with the work of Raymond Carey as we look at some of the many fabulous homes he created in Grosse Pointe. Carey was a key figure in Grosse Pointe, creating prestigious homes for prominent clientele during the 1920’s – 1930’s. His work was extremely sought after.

Raymond Marwood-Elton Carey was born in Guernsey, Channel Islands (United Kingdom) on 27 August 1883. He was educated in Bath, but by 1901, he had relocated to London…

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Last week we introduced you to some of the homes that were owned by the well-known Holley family. At one point in time George Malvin Holley Sr. owned five homes in Grosse Pointe, two of which were designed by well-respected English architect Raymond Carey. 

This week we stay on Provencal to present another majestic home designed by Raymond Carey – welcome to 338 Provencal. The 10,304 sq ft English Tudor Manor was completed in 1928, for Howard F. Smith, VP of the Canada and Dominion Sugar Company in Ontario. 

338 Provencal it is an exquisite stone Tudor residence with all the hallmarks of an English estate. The asymmetric design has elegant limestone detailing around the large bay windows on the first floor, along with a striking slate roof – a…

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Happy 2021!

In our last post we presented the Mid-Century Modern model ‘Holiday Homes’ that were designed by William F. Baker, and built by Cox & Baker, during the 1950’s and 60’s. At least seven ‘Holiday Homes’, held annually, were built and introduced to the Grosse Pointes between 1951 and 1962. 

This week we are going to introduce you to some of the homes that were owned by the well-known Holley family. At one time George Malvin Holley Sr. owned five homes in Grosse Pointe, two of which were designed by well-respected English architect Raymond Carey.

The Holley’s were a prominent family in Detroit during the first half of the 20th century. The head of the family was George M. Holley Sr., born in Port Jervis, New York in 1878. Having…

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Last week, in part 2, we explored residences on the east side of Beverly Road - the even numbered homes: 24 through 44 - the first lots to be sold and developed. 

This week, in the final part of our series on Beverly Road, we head to the residences on the west side of the street - the odd numbered homes: 23 through 45 - built between 1920 and 1936. The modern photo’s below are courtesy of: Katie Doelle. 

23 Beverly Road - completed in 1925
Renowned local architect Robert O. Derrick designed this substantial asymmetrical Neo-Georgian residence. The distinctive dormers in the roof dominate the front elevation of this 5,830 sq ft home. The property was constructed for Edwin Barbour Henry and his wife, Barbara Wick, of Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Henry…

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Last week we presented the work of Minoru Yamasaki, one of the most prominent architects of the 20th century. In a career spanning three decades, he created over 250 buildings throughout the world, including the World Trade Center, and at least five projects in Grosse Pointe. 

This week we are going to explore one of his residential projects in greater depth – 664 Shoreham, Grosse Pointe Woods.

What makes the architectural heritage of Grosse Pointe so unique is how the varying architectural styles from different eras are represented and characterized. Many of the older homes that were designed by nationally recognized designers shout, “I am by Albert Kahn”, or “of course I was designed by George D. Mason”. However, there are others, the hidden…

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Last week we explored two magnificent homes – 191 Lake Shore and 66 Renaud – designed by George D. Mason & Company that have been lost.

This week we turn to a house that is as grand today as the day it was built – welcome to 270 Voltaire - arguably one of Grosse Pointe’s finest estates. Located in the heart of Grosse Pointe Farms, this stunning home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mrs. R. H. Macauley in 1929.

While the majority of the design is distinctly Georgian, the four giant columns that support the intricately decorated portico, rising between the two adjoining wings, draw upon inspiration from the Old South. The 8,435 sq ft mansion is breathtaking inside and out. The front elevation features many beautifully carved elements, and…

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Last week we explored several of the sublime houses on Ridge Road, Grosse Pointe Farms. This week, we stay on Ridge Road and visit the Cottage Hospital Nurses Residence – now home to the Services for Older Citizens (SOC).

The building, located at 158 Ridge Road, was originally built for the newly constructed Cottage Hospital as a nurse’s residence. Cottage Hospital (now the Henry Ford Medical Center) was built in 1928 and was designed by the renowned Boston firm of Stevens & Lee.

Cottage Hospital – Courtesy of The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores By Arthur M. Woodford

The nurses’ residence, a separate building from the hospital, was the brainchild of Helen Hall Newberry Joy – daughter of Helen Handy Newberry and John Stoughton Newberry, and…

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Throughout our series of blog posts we regularly focus on the history of specific homes, profile individual designers and explore interesting roads.

This week we focus on the latter with an exploration of the first block of Kenwood Road, Grosse Pointe Farms, and its designer’s collection of beautifully crafted houses.

There are many roads in Grosse Pointe that have an abundance of homes created by some of Detroit’s most prominent architects – Bishop, Cloverly, Edgemont Park and Vendome being prime examples.

Kenwood is up there with the best of them, and may even lay claim to having the largest collection of homes – on one block – by the leading architectural talent of the 1920’s. With a road of such prominence we decided to separate the story of…

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