Found 59 blog entries tagged as Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe.

Last week we presented 560 Cadieux, a superb arts and craft home created in 1911 by architect Frank E. Hill for the Breitenbach family.

This week we return to our series on Grosse Pointe’s ‘lost estates’ and present 17100 E. Jefferson, designed by the firm of Trowbridge & Ackerman for Dexter M. Ferry Jr., built in 1915. Over the past few weeks we have presented a couple of estates, in the same area, that have subsequently been demolished – 16850 E. Jefferson (demolished 1981), and 17000 E. Jefferson (demolished in the 1970s). 

17100 is part of this distinctive group of homes that were located on large plots of land on the shores of Lake St. Clair, it was demolished in 1959 – one of the first of the grand estates to go.All three of these…

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Last week we explored another of Grosse Pointe’s ‘lost estates’ – 17000 E. Jefferson, designed by George W. Graves for Oren S. Hawes, built in 1914.

This week we would like to present 560 Cadieux, created in 1911 by architect Frank E. Hill for the Breitenbach family. 

Given that 17000 E. Jefferson and 560 Cadieux were built within three years of each other, this presents a superb example to the range of the architectural styles and trends that were present in Grosse Pointe at the beginning of the 20th century.  There are the grand, formal brick built colonial homes, such as the magnificent homes on Jefferson, and yet just around the corner there is a wonderful example of an Arts and Craft home, a style that was becoming extremely popular…

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Last week we explored one of Grosse Pointe’s ‘lost estates’ – 16850 E. Jefferson, also known as the Sycamores, designed by Bryant Fleming for Wesson and Winifred Dodge Grey Seyburn.

This week we stay with the lost estates and present a close neighbor of the Seyburn house, 17000 E. Jefferson.

17000 E. Jefferson was commissioned by Oren S. Hawes and was completed in 1914. George W. Graves designed this unique home, which appears to be quite different in style to the large colonial homes that were being constructed during this era. With a perfect view of the lake, the lot size and shape was very similar to that of 16850 E. Jefferson, in that it was once again extremely narrow (67’ x 1000’).

Constructed from brick it features a large amount of…

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Last week we introduced you to 1040 Harvard, one of the earlier residences George D. Mason designed in Grosse Pointe.

This week we are going to explore one of Grosse Pointe’s ‘lost estates’ – 16850 E. Jefferson, also known as the Sycamores. Last year we ran a series of posts, presenting the lost estates of Grosse Pointe. Many of these estates were completed in the early 20th century, and were subsequently demolished from the 1950’s onwards. The reason for the demolition(s) included – the homes were too big to maintain, structural problems, new owners wished to sub divide the plots. The Sycamores is part of this fascinating group, and its time to tell the story of this magnificent home.

16850 E. Jefferson was commissioned by Wesson and Winifred…

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Last week we presented 15840 Lakeview Court. This sensational home was built in 1931 by George D. Mason and was one of the latter homes he designed towards the end of his career. 

This week we stay with the work of Mr. Mason and take a look at one of his earliest projects in Grosse Pointe, 1040 Harvard. As we mentioned last week Mason first appeared in the community in 1882, when the firm of Mason & Rice was commissioned to design ‘Edgmere’ for Joseph Berry. Fast-forward to 1916, Mason now has his own firm and has been commissioned by John W. Staley to create a large home on Harvard. 

John W. Staley was one of the best known of the younger bank officers’ in the United States. Born in Danville, Pa. he graduated from Albion College, Michigan…

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Last week we introduced you to the homes designed and/or built by Carl L. Meek, a known architect (and builder) in Grosse Pointe during the late 1920’s.

This week we would like to present 15840 Lakeview Court. This sensational home was built in 1931 by one of Detroit’s architectural superstars, George D. Mason for Albert H. Schmidt.

As renowned Detroit historian Clarence M. Burton once wrote, quite simply George DeWitt Mason was “the dean of Detroit architects”. In a city that boasts the sublime skills of Albert Kahn, and Louis Kamper, Mason takes his place alongside these two great designers as the men responsible for many of Detroit’s iconic buildings. During a career that lasted 50 years George D. Mason created numerous historic buildings in…

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Last week we explored the two homes on Jefferson designed by Wallace Frost for the Bowen brothers – 16628 and 16632 East Jefferson.

This week we are going to explore some of the homes designed and/or built by Carl L. Meek, a known architect (and builder) in Grosse Pointe during the late 1920’s. Meek designed, and built, several homes in the community, including: 

  • 610 University Place (1926)
  • 604 University Place (1928)
  • 587 University Place (1928)
  • 598 University Place (1929)
  • 592 University Place (1929)
  • 229 Merriweather (1928)
  • 160 Touraine (1928)
  • 679 and 525 Rivard (1928)
  • 621 Fisher (1929)
  • 31 Renaud (1930)

Very little is known about Carl L. Meek and his career, but he was responsible, during the 1920’s, for not only…

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Last week we introduced you to 180 Lewiston and arguably the most prestigious residents to live in Grosse Pointe - Russian nobility, the Count, and Countess Tolstoy.

This week we turn our attention to two very distinguished homes on E. Jefferson designed by the extremely talented Wallace Frost. Brothers, Edgar W. Bowen, and Julian P. Bowen, owned the two homes, located in close proximity to each other – 16628 E. Jefferson, and 16632 E. Jefferson.

Edgar Woodbury Bowen was born in Detroit in 1886. His brother, Julian Perry Bowen, was born a year later in 1887. The siblings, graduates of the University of Michigan, both held senior positions (Edgar was Vice President and Secretary, while Julian was Vice President and Treasurer) at the Ferry-Morse,…

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Happy 2019!

In our last post we profiled one of E. Jefferson’s grand old ladies, 16004 E. Jefferson. Built in 1907 it was designed by the Detroit based firm of Mildner & Eisen for Dr. Herman Kreit.

This week we would like to present 180 Lewiston. This post isn’t so much about the house, but more about the rather highly noted couple that once resided in the home. As we mentioned in a recent post on 40 Sunningdale, some extremely prominent people have owned homes in Grosse Pointe. However, when Russian nobility - Count, and Countess Tolstoy - moved into 180 Lewiston this catapulted the home to the top of the charts in having the most prestigious residents of all.

180 Lewiston was designed by Marcus Burrowes, and completed in 1922 for Cameron…

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Last week we turned our attention to a significant period of transformation, the 1950s, introducing you to 40 Sunningdale and its high profile residents which has included a retired air force general, Henry Ford’s grandson, and a baseball superstar. 

This week we step back to 1907 and explore one of E. Jefferson’s grand old ladies, 16004 E. Jefferson. 

Built in 1907, 16004 E. Jefferson was designed by the Detroit based firm of Mildner & Eisen for Dr. Herman Kreit. The land on which the property is located dates back to 1811 when French settler, Joseph Tremble was granted the land by President James Madison. Paul Trombley later owned the site. In 1889 William Voigt purchased the plot for a reported $1,850 (around $50,000 today). Source: Traveling…

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