Found 59 blog entries tagged as Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe.

Last week we explored two magnificent homes – 191 Lake Shore and 66 Renaud – designed by George D. Mason & Company that have been lost.

This week we turn to a house that is as grand today as the day it was built – welcome to 270 Voltaire - arguably one of Grosse Pointe’s finest estates. Located in the heart of Grosse Pointe Farms, this stunning home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mrs. R. H. Macauley in 1929.

While the majority of the design is distinctly Georgian, the four giant columns that support the intricately decorated portico, rising between the two adjoining wings, draw upon inspiration from the Old South. The 8,435 sq ft mansion is breathtaking inside and out. The front elevation features many beautifully carved elements, and…

3817 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we explored 195 Lake Shore, the stunning home of Hugo and Clara Scherer. Designed by Louis Kamper it was originally a spectacular summer residence but became the family’s year-round home after World War 1. 

This week we present two further lost estates - 191 Lake Shore and 66 Renaud. Both residences are attributed to “the dean of Detroit architects”, George D. Mason. These two homes were built within twelve years of each other - 191 Lake Shore was completed in 1926, and 66 Renaud (attributed to George D. Mason & Company) was finished in 1938. The latter was one of Mason’s final projects in Grosse Pointe, and quite possibly one of last of his career (he died in 1948).

191 Lake Shore was commissioned by Harley Green Higbie and his wife,…

3040 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we explored one of the most recognizable homes on Lake Shore, number 699, previously known as Shadowlawn. It was designed by Maul & Lentz for Raphael Edward “Ray” Danaher, and completed in 1924. 

This week we would like to present 195 Lake Shore, built in 1898 for Hugo Scherer, his wife Clara, and their two daughters Marion, and Dorothy. Louis Kamper designed, what was originally, a spectacular summer residence. Located on Lake Shore Dr, at Moran Road, it was constructed during an era when rich Detroit families came to Grosse Pointe to spend the summer months close to the lake.

This was arguably one of Louis Kamper’s earliest projects in the Grosse Pointe communities. Prior to this Hugo Scherer had already hired Kamper to design his…

5422 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we presented the area of land containing 655 Lake Shore, which has changed dramatically over the years. The design, style, and functionality of all three homes that have been located there (the original farmhouse, the mansion known as Fairlawn, and the latest addition) couldn’t have been more different.

This week we stay on Lake Shore, and explore one of the most recognizable homes on the road, number 699, previously known as Shadowlawn. It was designed by Maul & Lentz for Raphael Edward “Ray” Danaher, and completed in 1924. The house, apparently, got its name, Shadowlawn, from the large trees that once occupied the front lawn. 

699 Lake Shore is located between Lochmoor Blvd, and Colonial Road. It currently sits on 1.25 acres;…

6355 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we explored two homes that had a rather short life span. The first, 507 Lake Shore was completed in 1977, and demolished in 1998. The second, 217 Lake Shore, was completed in 1949, and razed in the early 1990’s. 

This week we present an intriguing area in Grosse Pointe Shores on the corner of Lake Shore and Oxford roads. Over the years several estates have come and gone, and the parcel of land is now home to several very distinctive properties, including one of Grosse Pointe Shores more individual residences, 655 Lake Shore.

Based on research by the Grosse Pointe Historical Society we understand the original plot of land dates back to the 18th century ribbon farms that dominated early Grosse Pointe. These long strips of land ran down…

3575 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we featured four lost estates on Lake Shore that proved to be a mystery when it came to tracing their story - 677 Lake Shore, 605 Lake Shore, 70 Lake Shore, and 215 Lake Shore. All four homes were once magnificent estates on Lake Shore, all four have been demolished, and all four are too good to be forgotten.

This week we continue with the lost estates, but turn to two homes that had a rather short life span. The first, 507 Lake Shore was completed in 1977, and was demolished in 1998. The second, 217 Lake Shore, was completed in 1949, and razed during the early 1990’s. Thus proving it is not just historical homes that have been lost over time.

507 Lake Shore was a sprawling 9,500 sq ft Italian style villa completed in 1977. It was…

4036 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we continued our story on the lost estates with three magnificent homes created by Trowbridge and Ackerman between 1909 and 1915, which have now been demolished.

This week we continue with the theme of lost estates, but turn to four homes that are proving to be somewhat of an enigma. Most of the homes we feature can be attributed to a particular architect, and the original owner can be identified. With books, files, and online research there is, if you like, a “paper trail” to authenticate their story. However, every now and again we come across a residence that can prove to be rather stubborn when it comes to tracing its story. This week we have four homes – 677 Lake Shore, 605 Lake Shore, 70 Lake Shore, and 215 Lake Shore - that fall…

1393 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we introduced you to 1 Ratbone Place. The beautiful home designed by Louis Kamper, between 1917-1918 for John G. Rumney.

This week we return to our series on the lost estates to continue our story of the homes created by Trowbridge and Ackerman. This talented duo from New York created three magnificent homes in Grosse Pointe – between 1909 and 1915. Sadly all three properties have been demolished, with the land sub divided to make way for new estates. 

These three homes were located at: 

  • 17040 E. Jefferson – built in 1909 for Luther S. Trowbridge Jr. – lawyer, and prominent businessman. 
  • 123 Lake Shore – built in 1910 for Truman H. Newberry – president and treasurer of the Detroit Steel & Spring Company, former secretary of the…

1918 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we explored another of Grosse Pointes lost estates, 735 Lake Shore, a grand Tudor mansion designed by Albert Kahn for Alvan Macauley, in 1930, which was demolished in 1974.

This week we travel to 1 Rathbone Place. Sitting on close to 1 acre of land, running from Jefferson to the lake, this beautiful home was designed by famed Detroit architect, Louis Kamper, between 1917-1918, for John G. Rumney. Image courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society.

1 Rathbone Place, an Italian Villa, is a particularly striking home. The three magnificent archways dominate the front elevation, as does the low sloping tiled roof, and the large overhanging eaves. As you would expect with any creation by Kamper the 6,805 sq ft home is filled with superb…

2463 Views, 0 Comments

Last week we explored one of Grosse Pointes lost estates, 17100 E. Jefferson, a magnificent home designed by the firm of Trobridge & Ackerman for Dexter M. Ferry Jr., in 1915 - demolished in 1959.

This week we would like to present another superb home that has been lost – 735 Lake Shore, created by Albert Kahn in 1930, for Alvan Macauley. The home was one of the architectural masterpieces that were constructed on the shores of Lake St. Clair during the golden era of stately mansions. It was one of the ‘stand out’ estates on Lake Shore Drive. But, like so many of them demolished to make way for a subdivision.

The grand Tudor inspired home was located on 52 acres (20 acres were in Grosse Pointe Woods). The estate stretched from Lake Shore to…

7853 Views, 0 Comments