Found 58 blog entries tagged as Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe.

Last week we presented Sunnycroft, the lost estate of Mrs. William K. Anderson that was once located at 70 Moran. It was completed in 1919 having been designed by William F. Goodrich, and demolished in 1957.

This week we head to Windmill Pointe - one of the most recognized, and historic areas in the Grosse Pointe communities. The origin of Windmill Pointe dates back to 1712.

During the early 20th century Grosse Pointe was rapidly transforming from a summer retreat to a year round residence. Improved roads to Detroit coupled with the advent of the car were heavily influencing this transformation. Grosse Pointe Park was one area in particular that was proving to be extremely popular for wealthy Detroiters and professionals to re locate to the suburbs.…

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Last week we explored the work of Frank A. Miles. He designed close to 20 homes that we know of, throughout Grosse Pointe between 1926 and 1948. Much of his work is on some of Grosse Pointe’s more noted streets such as Provencal, Lothrop, Touraine, and Renaud. 

This week we return to the lost estates to present 70 Moran, also known as Sunnycroft. William F. Goodrich designed this beautiful property, in 1919, for Mrs. William K. Anderson. 

As the photos below demonstrate it is a superb residence created in an English Cottage style. This approach was popular in many areas of the United States from 1915 to 1940, from small homes to grand manors. Typical characteristics associated with this approach include an asymmetric configuration, a steeply…

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Last week we explored 226 Provencal. Completed in 1940 Frank A. Miles designed this striking Regency manor for John Lord Booth - founder, owner and chairman of numerous broadcasting companies throughout Michigan and the United States during the 1940’s.

This week we stay with the work of Frank Allen Miles and present several of his other projects that are located throughout the Grosse Pointe communities. As we mentioned last week very little is known about the career of Mr. Miles but we do know he designed close to 20 homes that we know of, throughout Grosse Pointe between 1926 and 1948. Much of his work is on some of Grosse Pointe’s more noted streets such as Provencal, Lothrop, Touraine, and Renaud.

The majority of Frank Miles projects were…

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Last week we presented Alger Place and Island Lane. Originally the location of the Frederick Moulton Alger estate - "By-Way" - located at 17700 E. Jefferson, the house was demolished in the 1960's and the land used to create these two subdivisions.

This week we head to one of the most sought after streets in Grosse Pointe – Provencal, and to house number 226. Located next to the Country Club of Detroit golf course, Provencal is situated on the only private gated road in the community.

Provencal is home to some stunning properties, designed by some of Detroit’s finest architects. The homes on Provencal are in every sense of the word ‘private’. A private street, with private homes, and with so little historic information available many of the houses…

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Last week we explored what is possibly the most recognizable building in the Grosse Pointe Communities – 32 Lake Shore Drive – home of the Grosse Pointe War Memorial. Completed in 1910 the “Moorings” was designed by recognized architect Charles Adam Platt for Russell A. Alger Jr.

This week we stay with the Alger name, and introduce Alger Place, along with Island Lane. As with many of the early grand estates along Lake Shore a number of these homes were demolished between the 1950’s and 1970’s, and the land sub divided. “By-Way” was one such example. Located on the shores of Lake Saint Clair “By-Way” was designed by William B. Stratton & Frank C. Baldwin. It completed in 1908 for Frederick Moulton Alger, brother of Russell Alger Jr., who owned the…

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Last week we presented a spectacular Mediterranean Revival home – 456 University Place – designed in 1925 by Charles Lewis Phelps.

This week we turn to what is possibly the most recognizable building in the Grosse Pointe Communities – 32 Lake Shore Drive – home of the Grosse Pointe War Memorial. Completed in 1910 it was originally the residence of Russell A. Alger Jr. Also known as ‘The Moorings’, it was designed by recognized architect Charles Adam Platt.

Upon completion the property was one of the finest country estates on Lake Shore Drive. Set on 4.5 acres, the residence was created in Italian Renaissance architecture. This approach was a style Charles Platt was particularly passionate about having spent time in Italy, in 1892, to study…

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Last week we introduced you to 1004 Three Mile Drive designed by Hugh Taylor Millar for Bartholomew H. Manning in 1928.

This week we stay in the 1920’s and stop by a house that was designed in 1925 by Charles Lewis Phelps – 456 University Place. It is a spectacular Mediterranean Revival inspired property located on one of the most sort-after streets in Grosse Pointe.

The Mediterranean Revival style was a popular architectural trend throughout the United States. The style was introduced to the US towards the end of the nineteenth century, peaking in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s. It is a unique style, but also very similar to the Spanish Revival buildings that were also popular during this era. Properties were created to emulate the…

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Last week we explored the Grosse Pointe Woods Theater designed by Charles N. Agree for the United Detroit Theaters chain in 1948.

This week we pay a visit to 1004 Three Mile Drive in Grosse Pointe Park. Designed by Hugh Taylor Millar for Bartholomew H. Manning in 1928, it is an impactful home with an striking two-story entrance.

What makes this 5,962 sq ft house interesting is the lack of a dominant architectural style. It has been described as Georgian, but given the more readily identifiable Georgian homes that were constructed in Grosse Pointe, during the 1920’s, it can be argued this home is a looser interpretation of this approach.

The house is dominated by the prominent two-story entranceway, which features an arched window on the…

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Last week we presented 270 Voltaire Place - arguably one of Grosse Pointe’s finest estates. Located in the heart of Grosse Pointe Farms, this stunning home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mrs. R. H. Macauley in 1929.

This week we take a trip to the Grosse Pointe Woods Theater. Designed by Charles N. Agree for the United Detroit Theaters Chain, it opened in February 1948 with the film “Crossfire”, staring Robert Mitchum and Gloria Grahame. 

The building was designed using the Art Moderne (Streamline Moderne) architectural approach. This was an extremely popular style throughout the United States from around 1930 – 1945. Based on research by circaoldhouses.com we understand, in stylistic terms, ‘Streamline Moderne represents the last phase of Art…

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Last week we explored two magnificent homes – 191 Lake Shore and 66 Renaud – designed by George D. Mason & Company that have been lost.

This week we turn to a house that is as grand today as the day it was built – welcome to 270 Voltaire - arguably one of Grosse Pointe’s finest estates. Located in the heart of Grosse Pointe Farms, this stunning home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mrs. R. H. Macauley in 1929.

While the majority of the design is distinctly Georgian, the four giant columns that support the intricately decorated portico, rising between the two adjoining wings, draw upon inspiration from the Old South. The 8,435 sq ft mansion is breathtaking inside and out. The front elevation features many beautifully carved elements, and…

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