Found 351 blog entries tagged as Higbie Maxon Agney.

Last week we presented the final years of 241 Lake Shore, a magnificent estate built in 1913 for Mrs. Henry Stephens. Beginning in the late 1940’s it became known as the “Kanzler Mansion”. It was then sold several times before coming to a pivotal moment in its history in 1987, followed by its demolition in 1988.

This week we are celebrating 10 years of the Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe blog. With nearly 500 posts, posted every week since July 2014, it has been an absolute pleasure to share the superb history of this special community.

Since the beginning of the 20th century Grosse Pointe has become the location of some of the finest homes that have been built in the United States. The early mansions that were created on Lake Shore…

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Last week we presented the story of the lost garden at 241 Lake Shore, the former grand estate of Mrs. Henry Stephens (wife of lumber baron Henry Stephens Jr. who passed in 1910). The magnificent property was designed by Charles A. Platt in 1913. It was demolished in 1988.

This week we stay with 241 Lake Shore as we delve into the final part of the story – beginning in the late 1940’s, when it became known as the “Kanzler Mansion”, through to the properties dramatic conclusion in 1987.

After the original owner Mrs. Stephens passed on May 12, 1944, it appears 241 Lake Shore was purchased by Ernest C. Kanzler, a prominent figure in Detroit who had “full responsibility for converting the auto industry for World War II.” Source: Detroit Free Press…

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Last week we presented one of the lost homes of Grosse Pointe, 15500 Windmill Pointe which was recently demolished in the spring of 2024. Completed in 1928, it was designed by the architectural firm of Benjamin and Straight for Colonel Jesse G. Vincent.

This week we present the story of the lost garden at 241 Lake Shore, the former grand estate of Mrs. Henry Stephens, designed by Charles A. Platt in 1913. The property was demolished in 1988.

As most of you are aware, over the years Grosse Pointe has lost many fine estates. It is not just the magnificent homes that have gone but also countless gardens that were designed by some of the nation’s most noteworthy architects. This includes the superb gardens at 241 Lake Shore, created by William…

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Last week we presented one of the lost homes of Grosse Pointe, 111 Lake Shore. Also known as “Cherryhurst” it was built in 1907 for prominent businessman Paul Harvey Deming, one of the first year-round residences to be constructed in Grosse Pointe Farms.

This week we stay with the theme of lost homes as we explore a one-of-a-kind residence 15500 Windmill Pointe - recently demolished in the spring of 2024. 

Grosse Pointe is known for its collection of historic and distinctive homes. One of the more individual properties in the community was 15500 Windmill Pointe Drive, Grosse Pointe Park. Not only did it have a memorable exterior, but the interior was also just as fascinating - it is possible it was the only home on the lake that had a canal…

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Last week we concluded our presentation on the work of Carl R. Habermas as we explored some of the Art Deco and Modern inspired homes he created in Grosse Pointe from the 1930’s through to the 1950’s.

This week we look at one of the lost homes of Grosse Pointe, 111 Lake Shore. Also known as “Cherryhurst” it was built in 1907 for prominent businessman Paul Harvey Deming, one of the first year-round residences to be constructed in Grosse Pointe Farms. The architect, so far, has not been identified.

The asymmetrical property was situated on a long narrow two-acre lot, measuring 150 feet wide by 614 feet deep (depicted by the plan below). It was reached via a private drive from Lake Shore through an iron gate between brick piers, bearing stone…

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Last week we presented the work of J. H. Gustav Steffens and Carl R. Habermas. Together, the duo, who both had long and distinguished careers, designed multiple homes in the affluent suburbs of Metro Detroit during the 1930’s.

This week we continue with the work of Carl R. Habermas as we look at some of the Art Deco and Modern inspired homes he created in Grosse Pointe from the 1930’s through to the 1950’s.

Carl R. Habermas was a widely respected and talented designer. He specialized in residential and commercial projects creating many homes in the Metro Detroit area in an array of architectural styles. This included numerous projects in his much sought after Art Deco and Mid-Century Modern approach. Source: Michigan Society of Architects…

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Last week we headed to one of the most prestigious streets in Grosse Pointe Farms, Provencal, to explore the elegant modern marvels, many of which were built by the respected architect/builder Hilary H. Micou in the late 1950’s and 1960’s.

 This week we turn our attention to the renowned firm of J. H. Gustav Steffens and Carl R. Habermas. Together, the duo, who both had long and distinguished careers, designed multiple homes in the affluent suburbs of Metro Detroit during the 1930’s.

J. H. Gustav Steffens was an established architect in Detroit. creating large residences in the prosperous suburbs of the city. He was born in Manistee, Michigan, on March 28, 1884. His early experience as an architect came from working with his father, Henry, who…

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Last week we concluded our presentation on The Junior League of Detroit’s Designers’ Show House which began in 1976 and has been held at 25 different houses. This year was the final event held at 315 Lakeland.

This week we head to one of the most prestigious streets in Grosse Pointe Farms, Provencal, to explore the elegant modern marvels, many of which were built by the respected architect/builder Hilary H. Micou in the late 1950’s and 1960’s.

The homes on Provencal evoke a sense of grandeur – timeless designs created in an array of architectural styles that have been designed by some of Detroit’s leading architects. Most of the homes on this private road were completed prior to the 1940, however, post 1950 the development of Provencal has not…

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Last week we began a two-part story of the history of the Junior League of Detroit’s (JLD) Designers’ Show House (DSH). The event, which began in 1976, has been held in 25 different houses, raised over $5million, and has welcomed over 280,000 guests.

This week we conclude the history of the event as we look at the homes from 2000 through 2024. The journey has now come to an end after 48 years, with 315 Lakeland, its final destination. 

The Designers’ Show Houses: 2000 – 2024.

2000 – 15410 Windmill Pointe
15410 Windmill Pointe is an English inspired manor house designed by Alfred Hopkins & Associates. It was completed, in 1924, for William Harris, an investment banker, a significant authority in zoology, and father of stage actress, Julie…

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Last week we explored 16638 E Jefferson, originally built for Frank W. Eddy in 1911-12. In 1927, under the new ownership of John B. Ford Jr., the house underwent an extensive remodel to create the property we know today.

This week we begin a two-part story of the history of the Junior League of Detroit’s (JLD) Designers’ Show House (DSH). The event is currently being held at 315 Lakeland, Grosse Pointe. However, after 48-years, the journey will come to an end with this, its final destination.

The JLD’s Designers Show House began in 1976 and has been held in 25 different houses (23 in the Grosse Pointe communities and 2 in Detroit). The event was first conceived in San Francisco in the early 1970’s. During this time a member of the JLD headed to…

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