Found 216 blog entries tagged as Higbie Maxon Agney.

Last week we presented the story of 22 Oxford Road. Completed in 1941, the property was built for respected businessmen and acclaimed powerboat owner and racer Herbert (Herb) A. Mendelsohn. It is not known who designed the house, but it appears it was built by prolific builder Walter Mast. It was razed in 2006.

This week we would like to introduce you to another lost home that was located on the corner of Oxford Road and Lake Shore – welcome to 665 Lake Shore. The Regency Moderne style property was completed for prolific inventor, Robert Pauli Scherer, in 1951. It was designed by prominent architect Hugh T. Keyes who considered the property to be one of his more significant works. 

665 Lake Shore was a 7,050 sq ft home, situated on 3 lots. The…

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Last week we presented the story of Frank D. Wilberding, a prolific builder of fine homes in Grosse Pointe. In the space of 25 years, from around 1950 through to the 1970’s, Mr. Wilberding helped design and build over one hundred homes in the community. The majority of the “Wilberding Homes” are classically styled center entrance Colonial properties - one of the most popular architectural styles found in Grosse Pointe. 

This week we turn our attention to a home completed in 1941, that has been lost over time – welcome to 22 Oxford. The property was built for respected industrialist and acclaimed powerboat owner and racer Herbert (Herb) A. Mendelsohn. It is not known who designed the house, but it appears it was built by prolific builder Walter…

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Happy 2022!

In our last post we shared the story of our very own office - 83 Kercheval. The roots of Higbie Maxon Agney can be traced back to 1929, to the Maxon Brothers Real Estate firm, started by Paul and Richard Maxon. The Maxon Brothers office was originally located at 16914 Kercheval, in The Village. During the early 1940’s the brothers moved to their new office on the Hill, located at 83 Kercheval where Higbie Maxon Agney remains located today.

For our first post in 2022, we would like to present the story of Frank D. Wilberding, a prolific builder of fine homes in Grosse Pointe. In the space of 25 years, from around 1950 through to the 1970’s, Mr. Wilberding helped design and build over one hundred homes in the community. The majority of…

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Last week we introduced you to the work of George J. Haas, a noted designer responsible for creating multiple iconic buildings in Metro Detroit and Grosse Pointe, including the Grosse Pointe Park Municipal Building and Grosse Pointe South High School.

This week we would like to share the story of our very own office - 83 Kercheval. The roots of Higbie Maxon Agney can be traced back to 1929, to the Maxon Brothers Real Estate firm, started by Paul and Richard Maxon. The Maxon Brothers office was originally located at 16914 Kercheval, in The Village. During the early 1940’s the brothers moved to their new office on the Hill, located at 83 Kercheval where Higbie Maxon Agney remains located today.

The Hill, as a commercial center, began to take shape…

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Last week we explored the history of 277 Lincoln, an iconic Italian Renaissance style home that was once the carriage house on the “Edgeroad” estate, located at 251 Lincoln, designed by Louis Kamper. The carriage house, along with the potting shed and a large, heated greenhouse were located at the rear of the property facing Lincoln Rd.

This week we would like to introduce you to the work of George J. Haas, a noted designer responsible for creating multiple iconic buildings in Metro Detroit and Grosse Pointe, including the Grosse Pointe Park Municipal Building and Grosse Pointe South High School.

George Haas was born in Detroit in 1889, the son of a cigar maker. He trained at the Detroit Technological Institute and resided in St Clair Shores.…

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Last week we explored 114 Lothrop, a grand Regency home designed by Hugh T. Keyes in 1937, for decorated Canadian World War 1 veteran, Doctor J. Stewart Hudson. Measuring 10,586 sq ft it is one of Keyes larger homes in Grosse Pointe. It was built by Talbot & Meier. 

This week we delve into the history of 277 Lincoln. This iconic Italian Renaissance style home was once the carriage house on the “Edgeroad” estate, located at 251 Lincoln (the original address was 17743 E. Jefferson), designed by Louis Kamper, in 1918. The carriage house, along with the potting shed and a large heated greenhouse (to the left of the carriage house) were located at the rear of the property facing Lincoln Rd.

251 Lincoln was completed in 1918, for Murray W. Sales, a…

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Last week we told the story of 61 Lochmoor Boulevard, a brick built French Colonial property, designed and built by Walter H. Mast, in 1942, as a speculative home. That same year businessman Donald A. Noble purchased the residence. 

This week we stop by 114 Lothrop, a grand Regency home designed by Hugh T. Keyes in 1937, for decorated Canadian World War 1 veteran, Doctor J. Stewart Hudson. Measuring 10,586 sq ft it is one of Keyes larger homes in Grosse Pointe. It was built by Talbot & Meier.

114 Lothrop, “Hudson House” is one of several Regency style homes built by Keyes in Grosse Pointe during the 1930’s. An article by Thomas W. Brunk, in the Architectural Forum 1937, explains ‘few traditional domestic styles are more in harmony with…

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Last week we presented the story of Rathbone Place – the historic street has some of the finest one-of-a-kind residences in Grosse Pointe. With the first property completed well over 100 years ago, this private street is recognized as a noteworthy historic district. 

This week we head to 61 Lochmoor Boulevard. The 3,659 sq ft brick built French Colonial property was designed and built by Walter H. Mast, in 1942.

61 Lochmoor was built as a speculative home. It was originally listed for sale by the architect/builder Walter Mast. The definition of a speculative home is – ‘a residence built without a particular buyer in mind or under contract but designed to appeal to the maximum market possible’. Speculative homes were particularly popular in…

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Last week we explored the history of 4 Rathbone Place, a stunning Colonial Revival home completed in 1916-17 for Samuel T. Douglas, a senior member of one of the oldest law firms in Detroit, Douglas and Bowen. It was designed by the renowned duo of Chittenden and Kotting.

This week we stay on Rathbone Place to present the full story of this historic street that has some of the finest one-of-a-kind residences in Grosse Pointe dating back to the beginning of the Twentieth century. One of the earliest inhabitants on the street was Charles A. Rathbone, president of the Buhl Malleable Company. His father, William P. Rathbone, was one of the most prominent and successful real estate men in the state of Michigan during the nineteenth century. It is also…

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Last week we presented the full story of 17805 E Jefferson, the huge W. Howie Muir estate completed in 1913, by the renowned designers Chittenden and Kotting. The W. Howie Muir residence was a grand 35-room Colonial home located on a large lot that ran from Lincoln to Fisher Road. After suffering catastrophic damage from a flood in December 1953, the property was demolished and the land sub divided. 

This week we stay with the work of Chittenden and Kotting as we explore 4 Rathbone Place, a stunning Colonial Revival home completed in 1916-17 for Samuel T. Douglas, a senior member of one of the oldest law firms in Detroit, Douglas and Bowen. 

It is apparent 4 Rathbone Place was one of the last projects Chittenden and Kotting completed before…

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