Found 9 blog entries tagged as Ellen Biddle Shipman.

Last week we took a final look at the collective efforts of Charles A. Platt and Ellen Biddle Shipman as we explored 242 Provencal. The lost mansion was completed in 1934, for Mrs. Marion Jarvis Alger. It was razed in the 2000's. 

This week we take a look at our final Ellen Biddle Shipman project as we stop by 380 Provencal. The American Colonial style home was designed by Raymond Carey for Mr. and Mrs. Courtenay D. Allington in 1929. Ellen Biddle Shipman designed the formal garden - her second project on Provencal.

380 Provencal is an excellent example of an early American Colonial home. The 6,779 sq ft residence has superb views over the golf course and of course a beautiful garden at the rear of the house. The interior of the home had great…

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Last week we continued with the collaborative work of Charles Platt and Ellen Biddle Shipman as we explored 99 Lothrop. The Georgian Colonial property was designed for Allen Fulton Edwards in 1928, Ellen Biddle Shipman, designed the garden.

This week we take a final look at the collective efforts of this talented duo as we explore 242 Provencal. The lost mansion was completed in 1934, for Mrs. Marion Jarvis Alger, the widow of Russel A. Alger Jr.

The affiliation of Charles Platt and Ellen Biddle Shipman began around 1910. By 1912, Shipman was collaborating with Platt on gardens across the United States, including one of their first joint projects in Grosse Pointe - 32 Lake Shore “the Moorings” (now the War Memorial) in 1910/11, created for…

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Last week we focused on the work of Ellen Biddle Shipman, a nationally renowned landscape architect who was known for her formal gardens, simple clean geometries, and lush planting style. Shipman, throughout her career, created over 650 gardens, including at least 60 in Grosse Pointe – more than any other community in the United States. 

This week we continue our profile of nationally recognized female landscape architects in Grosse Pointe as we profile two further designers – Eleanor Roche and Ruth Bramley Dean.

The early 20th century was a pivotal moment for the emergence of women in the largely male dominated field of landscape architecture. Ellen Biddle Shipman was at the forefront of this rise. In an interview in 1938, she stated, "until…

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Last week we profiled Norval Wardrop, a well-known architect in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th Century. Aside from working on numerous commercial projects he also created fine homes for prestigious clients, including 319 Lincoln in Grosse Pointe.

This week we focus on the work of Ellen Biddle Shipman, a nationally renowned landscape architect who was known for her formal gardens, simple clean geometries, and lush planting style. Shipman, throughout her career, created over 650 gardens, including at least 46 in Grosse Pointe – more than any other community in the United States. 

Ellen Biddle Shipman was considered a pioneer in her field during the first half of the 20th century. Born in Philadelphia on November 5, 1869, she spent her early…

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Last week we presented the history of St. Clare parish, school and church. The origins of the parish date back to 1923. In 1927, the first parish school opened, designed by Van Leyen, Schilling & Keogh. The new church was dedicated in 1953, designed by Diehl and Diehl.

This week we head to 355 Lincoln, one of the most distinguished homes in Grosse Pointe City. The 8,700 sq ft English Manor was designed by the renowned New York based firm Alfred Hopkins & Associates for Dr. Theodore McGraw, Jr. The gardens were designed by legendary landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman. 

355 Lincoln was completed in 1923. It is a striking property and markedly prominent in the community. The house has beautiful architectural details inside and…

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Last week we explored 114 Lothrop, a grand Regency home designed by Hugh T. Keyes in 1937, for decorated Canadian World War 1 veteran, Doctor J. Stewart Hudson. Measuring 10,586 sq ft it is one of Keyes larger homes in Grosse Pointe. It was built by Talbot & Meier. 

This week we delve into the history of 277 Lincoln. This iconic Italian Renaissance style home was once the carriage house on the “Edgeroad” estate, located at 251 Lincoln (the original address was 17743 E. Jefferson), designed by Louis Kamper, in 1918. The carriage house, along with the potting shed and a large heated greenhouse (to the left of the carriage house) were located at the rear of the property facing Lincoln Rd.

251 Lincoln was completed in 1918, for Murray W. Sales, a…

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Last week we explored “Rose Terrace I” completed in 1910, by Albert Kahn for Horace Elgin Dodge. 

This week we present the story of its successor, “Rose Terrace II” – arguably the most acclaimed residence to be designed, built, and razed, in all of the Grosse Pointe communities. And one of the finest houses of its kind to be built in the United States. Image courtesy of Wikipedia.

“Rose Terrace II” was located at 12 Lake Shore Drive on an 8.8-acre site where “Rose Terrace I” and the original Country Club of Detroit had once stood. The original home had been razed in 1931, to accommodate the new French-styled Louis XV château for Anna Dodge (widow of Horace E. Dodge) and her second husband, former actor Hugh Dillman. 

The palatial palace…

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Last week we presented the Trial Gardens at The Grosse Pointe War Memorial. The Trial Garden was originally commissioned by the Grosse Pointe Garden Center – an organization founded in 1950 to succeed the Grosse Pointe War Memorial’s Garden and Grounds Committee. Eleanor Roche, a noted landscape architect, designed the gardens.

This week we head to Grosse Pointe City, and to one of the largest homes constructed, 355 Lincoln.

Completed in 1923 for Theodore McGraw, Jr., the noted New York firm Alfred Hopkins & Associates designed it. The 8,733 sq ft English manor is a striking property, and particularly prominent in the community. The exterior is stucco, with a slate roof. While the exterior has subtle architectural details, the inside is awash…

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Last week we presented a spectacular Mediterranean Revival home – 456 University Place – designed in 1925 by Charles Lewis Phelps.

This week we turn to what is possibly the most recognizable building in the Grosse Pointe Communities – 32 Lake Shore Drive – home of the Grosse Pointe War Memorial. Completed in 1910 it was originally the residence of Russell A. Alger Jr. Also known as ‘The Moorings’, it was designed by recognized architect Charles Adam Platt.

Upon completion the property was one of the finest country estates on Lake Shore Drive. Set on 4.5 acres, the residence was created in Italian Renaissance architecture. This approach was a style Charles Platt was particularly passionate about having spent time in Italy, in 1892, to study…

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